The ‘End’ of the Internet? What Two-Tiered Service Actually Entails

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Despite mounting opposition, the Federal Communications Commission recently made a mark on the years-long net neutrality debate by endorsing a two-tiered internet system. Some are decrying this decision as the literal end to an open and free internet, while others claim that it will increase quality for all users. What is certain is that implementation of a two-tiered internet will greatly affect the experience for millions of users, many of whom rely on the internet to provide everything from news to entertainment. Whether these changes will be for the better or worse still remains a hotly contested subject.

What Is a Two-Tiered Internet?

Comprehending the two-tiered system can be challenging, especially in light of the numerous opinions on the matter. Unlike the current configuration, a two-tiered internet would allow service providers to charge content producers for faster access. Those customers paying for the premium service would be privy to this newly upgraded content, while those who do not upgrade will be relegated to the ‘public’ internet, which will return results at a much slower pace.

This system will allow certain content producers to take precedence over those who have not paid a premium. Conversely, those companies unable or unwilling to pay such premiums will find themselves stuck with slower speeds and less-than-impressive search results. This can have a huge impact on many small businesses and organizations, as well as those individuals who utilize popular blogging platforms for a variety of purposes.

What About Net Neutrality?

Net neutrality is the principle that the internet should remain untouched by the influence of service providers. This has been the standard since the inception of the internet, and has helped create the user experience that many have become accustomed to over the ensuing years. A neutral internet means that virtually anyone can introduce content to the public sphere. While things like search engine optimization may affect visibility, this information is still accessible by millions of people on a daily basis.

Proponents of net neutrality are cautioning that a two-tiered internet will have disastrous effects on this beloved medium, from winnowing unpopular political sentiment to putting the interests of advertisers and the like front and center. These changes will surely have an effect on the user experience, which up until this point has required a bit of savvy to successfully navigate the many diverse corridors of the internet. With the recent ruling, it seems that those in favor of net neutrality will be highly displeased by the coming changes.

Who Stands to Benefit From This System?

Corporate influence is a hot button issue these days, and not just when it comes to internet service. Every day large companies make historic gains in the world of politics and commerce; gains which many lament are bound to have a hefty price tag for the consumer. Internet access is a particularly volatile concern due to the open experience users have grown to love.

It’s no secret that corporations stand to benefit the most from this proposed two-tiered system. Telecommunication companies are in favor of the plan because it would allow them to charge customers for a higher level of service. In essence, this would create two internet experiences; one public and one private. People paying for the private service would be privy to only corporate-approved content. As a result, service providers would enjoy increased revenue from possibly millions of subscribers.

While the opposition against a tiered internet can sometimes be deafening, some claim that this new system will improve the quality of content available on the internet. Those subscribing to the higher-end service will enjoy faster access, especially when it comes to videos and movies, which typically require more bandwidth. The level of content is also projected to improve, since producers must pay for inclusion within the higher-tier service.

What Are Some Drawbacks?

The biggest drawback of a tiered internet is the lack of accessibility to those items not on the ‘fast lane’ of service. As it stands now, the internet is an extremely democratic endeavor: a person or organization comes up with a good idea, submits it to the open market place, and the idea summarily sinks or swims based on the public response. This allows content to be judged on its merits, no matter the financial heft possessed by the creator.

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With a pay system in place, only those with suitable financial resources can have their voices heard. Service providers may also be hesitant to provide access to those individuals or organizations creating controversial content, especially that which is critical of current business practices. In some instances, this may be a good thing. Offensive content will be less accessible to those who have no interest in seeing it. But, much like the debate regarding pornography, who should be in charge of deciding what content is worthy and what is not?

Some allege that a tiered system will limit the viewpoint of the average consumer, many of whom get their daily news via the internet. Cable news networks often receive similar complaints, particularly when it comes to falling in line with corporate interests.

The Changing Landscape of the Internet

In its current inception, the internet is an open market place of ideas where anyone is free to contribute. While this can be highly fulfilling in a number of instances, it also results in a lot of unwanted and ill-conceived content. It would be similar to a TV station allowing anyone with an interest to direct programming. Such a system would most likely produce a smattering of quality content amidst a great deal of pointless filler.

A two-tiered system would remove much of this filler, but this removal would come at the expense of those worthwhile items. It would also prevent some users from accessing the upper tier of service due to financial constraints. Much like cable TV, not everyone can afford the requisite monthly bills to enjoy premium service. While this certainly wouldn’t spur the downfall of the internet, it could create a gap between the two user groups.

Whatever one’s ultimate opinion, implementation of a two-tiered internet would completely alter the way the world interacts with this vital technology. Such a shift would standardize the internet, making the medium hew closer to things like TV and radio. While this would surely improve some aspects of web browsing, it might also remove the magic inherent in a free and open internet.

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Cheap Website Hosting Plans Will Actually The Recommended Plan For The Novice

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The website is the best way to expand the business in worldwide. But for managing the website, a website owner must need a hosting plan.
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Email Marketing Tips — Part 3: What Will People Actually Read?

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In this series of articles, we’ll explore the best tips to run successful email marketing tips. Email marketing, despite all the options available in an evolving digital world, is still the most personal and effective way to market services… if it’s done right.

In the first article in this series, we looked at list building. Without it, you can have the greatest content in the world but no one to read it. In the last article, we outlined creating great content to get people to expect and open your emails. When you have a large list of people who opt-in to receive your email marketing, you must give them content that will keep them opening those emails so your business will continue to sell your products and services. However, even with great content, there can be too much and readers will become confused or too little and recipients will feel your emails aren’t worth their time and effort.

What is “Just Enough” in an Email?

Firstly, the frequency at which emails are sent can be key to losing subscribers, or at least their attention. I receive several daily emails and while I’m interested in the products and content these emails contain, on heavy email days, when I’m just clicking the delete button based on email subjects and senders, I often delete some of the daily messages just because I’m in overload despite whatever discount or products they’re offering.

Studies have found that more than 50 percent of people who unsubscribe from email lists do so because they were getting too many emails. Furthermore, 22 percent of consumers said they stopped purchasing products from a company altogether because they were receiving too many emails or they were receiving emails that were irrelevant to them.

Man in despair buried head in computer keyboard

The easy answer to delivery overload is to ask your subscribers how often they wish to receive mailings. With a simple pulldown menu, people can decide between daily, weekly or monthly mailings and you can tailor three different mailings to contain the right amount of content for each. It’s important to also allow subscribers to adjust their settings to receive more or less as time goes on.

Secondly, as long as you are asking prospective customers to choose delivery options, why not ask them what they’d like to receive? Do they want tips on using your products? Do they want discount coupons? Do they want to know when you are having a sale or new merchandise for sale? It’s easy to create specific email content to please two or three specific groups of recipients and it assures you of keeping subscribers.

You will also want to ask subscribers to add you to their email contact list. Even with the best email clients, messages can end up in a spam folder from time to time. As many mass email services charge per email, any undelivered messages cost you money. A deliverable bounce rate of up to 1 percent to 2 percent is normal, but if it exceeds that amount, you will need to take some time to clean up your email list and find out where the problems lie. Most email services, such as Constant Contact (although this is not a recommendation of that service) offer certain tracking services as well as easy to use opt-out options which will make list management easy.

Get the Picture?

There is debate about including images in email marketing. Naturally, if you are selling products, you must show the product, however, you don’t need a large image. A small thumbnail is enough to get interested readers to click on a link to see more on your web site. Most objections are to superfluous images of smiling families and other stock images that people feel “humanizes” the emails. The addition of images for the sake of adding pictures will lengthen your email content and possibly frighten away readers who think they don’t have time to make it through the entire email. When people say, “I’ll come back to this later” they tend, more often than not, to never find the time to come back and after a few days, they will delete the message as it sinks lower on their delivery list in their email pane.

Using images in email that is not a specific product, creates a dead space that has little or no sales value, so maximizing the code behind those images is critical. Make sure that all of your images are actually links to your landing page or the targeted place on your website. This way, your potential image dead space can still drive traffic to a specific destination.

Business man in center of blue target

Think, before adding an image, “does this sell anything?” “Will a link help sell my service or product?” If the answer is “no!” then leave it out. This isn’t to say that a picture of you or you and your staff isn’t important. It sells your brand and humanizes your business and marketing materials. Showing the front of your business does the same thing and it adds to visual recognition if email recipients say to themselves, “I pass by this place all the time.” It then makes you convenient in the recipient’s mind.

Is It Worth a Thousand Words?

What about the amount of copy in your emails? Are you using copy to draw attention to something on your web site or is the copy a lesson, tip or trick to establish your expertise in your industry?

Most users aren’t going to read the full text of your email, especially if paragraphs are too long. They’re going to scan it for key points that are of interest to them (which is why they approved receiving your emails in the first place). Keep your text short by sticking to very small paragraphs of no more than three sentences or use bullet points for maximum focus and use font bolding and even additional colors to highlight words or phrases that you know will be important to your readers. There is a great chance that too much text will get your email deleted if the reader thinks there is too much to read, and it creates more risk for triggering spam filters, which is why sometimes approved emails end up going into your spam folder.

Test Before You Send!

The biggest pet peeves of an email recipient are:

  • Your auto-personalizer misspells their name.
  • Typos in your email.
  • The promises of the subject line are not included in the email.

Naturally, you should have your email proofread by several people as it’s impossible to proof your own material and one other person may not catch a subtle typo or misspelling.

It’s a good practice, once the material is proofed, to send a copy to several private emails (that have different email browsers) to see how the email comes through. Do all the embedded images show up? Does the text flow as it was entered? Are the links working properly? It’s an important step when dealing with digital distribution.

The subject line is important to test because of spam filters. They say that a subject line should be written like a press release; the first five words are the most important information. With an email subject line, you may not get more than five to eight words to get the reader to open that email. Part of testing what will be the best subject line, after initial testing, is to do an A/B test. Create two emails with two different subject lines and do a small test mailing to a control group of 10 percent of your email list and then look at the stats for the open rate. Go with the one that has the better results!

Online business deal

It’s incredibly easy to break your email list into two parts and simply send a separate email subject line to each and see which one gets a high open rate. Of course, there are other variables such as the time and date of the send. With time and further testing, you can determine when your customers prefer to receive and open your emails. Keep in mind that you are not the only one send emails (opted-in or unwanted) and the receipt of your email fights with others on heavy mailing days.

Know the CAN-SPAM Act!

Like any law, it takes some extensive reading and understanding to comply with the CAN-SPAM Act. If you want to run successful email marketing, it’s just one of the things you must know. The bulk mailing services have built in safeguards for most of the needed factors but as you are ultimately responsible for your mailings and non-compliance can bring expensive financial tolls, it’s something you should know.

Wikipedia has a simple explanation but it’s the actual law you should know.

Email Templates

One thing to consider is email templates that have responsive design. With more and more people using their mobile phones and tablets, rather than their desktop or laptop PCs, you should find an email service that has templates that are responsive to the device the reader is using. If your message is not responsive, the reader will ignore it.

If you’re forced to use a fixed-width template, it’s suggested you don’t go any larger than 550-600 pixels wide. Mobile users will have to scroll to read it but the size is still manageable.

In the next article on email marketing, we’ll look at email template options and effective design.

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How to install PHP 5.3 on a Windows XP machine? (And have it actually works)?

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question of Maxx : How to install PHP 5.3 on a Windows XP machine? (And have it actually works)?
And please do not refer me to some web page. I know that there are all kinds of voodoo magic that “they” recommend, I want to know if anyone knows how this will actually sloppy excuse for a platform funktioniert.Ich not saying that I do not appreciate a good link, but nothing what I’ve seen so far describes the actual experience I have to do Best Answer.

response from software rock star
I’ve done this many times, and it works fine. If you have difficulty following instructions to various websites, please make sure that IIS is installed properly. For this you can try a plain HTML page or an ASP page from IIS serve wollen.Ich know, you did not want links, but by the entire rewrite to process, I will you on this website, that a good tutorial to install PHP on IIS on Windows XP has to refer to. You did not mention the exact problem you have is my best bet so to show how to do it that does this page look good. If you told me the exact nature of the problem, I might be able to help you be better können.http: / / www.razorx.com / tutorials / PHPonIIS / The instructions are for PHP 5.1, but there is nothing else Software for 5.3 .- rock star coaching and mentoring on a trip to a developer for an IT Leader Http: / / www.softwarerockstar.com

know better? Leave your answer in the comments!

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How to install PHP 5.3 on a Windows XP machine? (And have it actually works)?

Posted by: Admin  :  Category: Web Hosting

question of Maxx : How to install PHP 5.3 on a Windows XP machine? (And have it actually works)?
And please do not refer me to some web page. I know that there are all kinds of voodoo magic that “they” recommend, I want to know if anyone knows how this will actually sloppy excuse for a platform funktioniert.Ich not saying that I do not appreciate a good link, but nothing what I’ve seen so far describes the actual experience I have to do Best Answer.

response from software rock star
I’ve done this many times, and it works fine. If you have difficulty following instructions to various websites, please make sure that IIS is installed properly. For this you can try a plain HTML page or an ASP page from IIS serve wollen.Ich know, you did not want links, but by the entire rewrite to process, I will you on this website, that a good tutorial to install PHP on IIS on Windows XP has to refer to. You did not mention the exact problem you have is my best bet so to show how to do it that does this page look good. If you told me the exact nature of the problem, I might be able to help you be better können.http: / / www.razorx.com / tutorials / PHPonIIS / The instructions are for PHP 5.1, but there is nothing else Software for 5.3 .- rock star coaching and mentoring on a trip to a developer for an IT Leader Http: / / www.softwarerockstar.com

know better? Leave your answer in the comments!

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How to install PHP 5.3 on a Windows XP machine? (And have it actually works)?

Posted by: Admin  :  Category: Web Hosting

question of Maxx : How to install PHP 5.3 on a Windows XP machine? (And have it actually works)?
And please do not refer me to some web page. I know that there are all kinds of voodoo magic that “they” recommend, I want to know if anyone knows how this will actually sloppy excuse for a platform funktioniert.Ich not saying that I do not appreciate a good link, but nothing what I’ve seen so far describes the actual experience I have to do Best Answer.

response from software rock star
I’ve done this many times, and it works fine. If you have difficulty following instructions to various websites, please make sure that IIS is installed properly. For this you can try a plain HTML page or an ASP page from IIS serve wollen.Ich know, you did not want links, but by the entire rewrite to process, I will you on this website, that a good tutorial to install PHP on IIS on Windows XP has to refer to. You did not mention the exact problem you have is my best bet so to show how to do it that does this page look good. If you told me the exact nature of the problem, I might be able to help you be better können.http: / / www.razorx.com / tutorials / PHPonIIS / The instructions are for PHP 5.1, but there is nothing else Software for 5.3 .- rock star coaching and mentoring on a trip to a developer for an IT Leader Http: / / www.softwarerockstar.com

know better? Leave your answer in the comments!

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Is VPS Hosting Actually Cheaper Than Shared Hosting?

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Shared web hosting plans have long been renowned for being the cheapest type of web hosting available. However, many people don’t realize that this is not an entirely true statement, as the billing structure and various other factors associated with the shared hosting environment can often cause it to be more expensive than VPS hosting plans.

VPS hosting is known as being the steppingstone between the shared hosting and dedicated hosting environments, giving you cheap access to a server partition that is only used by your network of websites at any given time. VPS hosting has a number of advantages over shared hosting, and in reality, it can actually be cheaper than shared hosting when purchased from certain web hosting providers. The following information outlines the major advantages of VPS hosting over shared hosting, and explains why it is possible to purchase a VPS hosting plan for less than shared hosting plan.

Monthly Billing Versus Annual Billing

Most VPS hosting providers allow their customers to pay on a monthly basis, only paying for the month they are about use in advance. On the other hand, shared web hosting providers require their customers to pay for a year in advance, which even at the low cost of five dollars per month, can equal as much as $ 60 plus setup fees. A VPS hosting plan that only costs $ 10-$ 20 per month can be paid for on a monthly basis, and the setup cost is therefore only $ 10-$ 20 per month plus any setup fees. Although the monthly cost of the VPS hosting plan may be more than shared hosting plan, the cost of setting up an purchasing a plan is actually less expensive.

Advantages of VPS Hosting Over Shared Hosting

Unlike shared hosting, VPS (virtual private server) hosting gives you much more flexibility, freedom, and overall control over the software configuration and administration of your server partition. With a shared hosting plan, you are required to share a single Web server with dozens or even hundreds of other webmasters simultaneously. This can create problems when other websites within your IP range that are hosted on your web server become liable for nefarious activity. In fact, there have been many cases in which legitimate websites have been taken off-line for hours or even days at a time because of illegitimate activity being performed by unrelated webmasters on their shared Web server. This risk is completely eliminated with VPS hosting, and the web hosting account owner also has the ability to install new software and web applications on their Web server.

Additional Cost Benefits of VPS Hosting Over Shared Hosting

Since VPS hosting plans are known for having less server downtime, and generally offer higher performance than shared hosting plans, it is possible to save money in the long run by eliminating the loss of sales due to slow page loads and server hardware/software issues. VPS hosting plans are more powerful, which means you can boost productivity and enhance the capabilities and functionality of your website through the use of proprietary server-side web applications that are specifically designed to automate and simplify administrative tasks.

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